Nailing your SAT Essay

Nailing your SAT Essay

  • January 27, 2017

One of the most frustrating things about the SAT is studying long and hard for the Math and English parts and ending up with a disappointing grade because of the essay. Let’s face it, we’re not all writers, and for those of us who don’t have it in them to come up with a perfect essay under pressure, here is a template that’ll help you get a good grade on your SAT essay from the first try!

The following template is color coded, each sentence describes the content it should hold based on its’ position in the essay, that means that every color represents a part of the essay (sentences of the same color will therefore have the same type of content), and the words describe the type of information the sentence should contain, good luck!

 

Introduction (2-5 Sentences):

First sentence should contain a general statement about the topic at hand, something to reel the reader in all while setting up the context for the following lines. Second sentence should contain the thesis statement as well as your position on the matter (whether you agree or disagree with it). End your introduction with the examples* you intend to use throughout your essay, no need to be very detailed since the point for now is to show that your reasoning is backed-up with factual proof.

 

Body Paragraph 1: Example 1 (5-7 sentences):

Start the paragraph by introducing your example with some form of transition, this shouldn’t be longer than one sentence. Elaborate on your example, giving relevant and contextual information about your argument, this should take between 3 and 4 sentences. Elaborate on your example, giving relevant and contextual information about your argument, this should take between 3 and 4 sentences. Elaborate on your example, giving relevant and contextual information about your argument, this should take between 3 and 4 sentences. End your paragraph with a sentence that links your example back to your thesis and shows how it supports it, this can take between 1 and 2 sentences. End your paragraph with a sentence that links your example back to your thesis and shows how it supports it, this can take between 1 and 2 sentences.

 

Body Paragraph 2: Example 2 (5-7 sentences):

Start the paragraph by introducing your example with some form of transition, this shouldn’t be longer than one sentence. Elaborate on your example, giving relevant and contextual information about your argument, this should take between 3 and 4 sentences. Elaborate on your example, giving relevant and contextual information about your argument, this should take between 3 and 4 sentences. Elaborate on your example, giving relevant and contextual information about your argument, this should take between 3 and 4 sentences. End your paragraph with a sentence that links your example back to your thesis and shows how it supports it, this can take between 1 and 2 sentences. End your paragraph with a sentence that links your example back to your thesis and shows how it supports it, this can take between 1 and 2 sentences.

 

Body Paragraph 3: Example 3 (5-7 sentences-optional*):

Start the paragraph by introducing your example with some form of transition, this shouldn’t be longer than one sentence. Elaborate on your example, giving relevant and contextual information about your argument, this should take between 3 and 4 sentences. Elaborate on your example, giving relevant and contextual information about your argument, this should take between 3 and 4 sentences. Elaborate on your example, giving relevant and contextual information about your argument, this should take between 3 and 4 sentences. End your paragraph with a sentence that links your example back to your thesis and shows how it supports it, this can take between 1 and 2 sentences. End your paragraph with a sentence that links your example back to your thesis and shows how it supports it, this can take between 1 and 2 sentences.

 

Conclusion (2-4 sentences):

Start by stating your thesis once more, this time using different words, this shouldn’t require more than 1 or 2 sentences. Start by stating your thesis once more, this time using different words, this shouldn’t require more than 1 or 2 sentences.  Follow-up by mentioning the examples you’ve used, keeping them general, all while highlighting why these examples support your thesis, this should also take between 1 and 2 sentences. Follow-up by mentioning the examples you’ve used, keeping them general, all while highlighting why these examples support your thesis, this should also take between 1 and 2 sentences.

*Note that a third body paragraph is not necessary unless it proves to be invaluable to your essays’ reasoning.

* Note that the examples given in the essay do not have to be fully true or exact, the exercise here is to test your aptitude at backing up your opinions rather than the veracity of the arguments you give. A big plus on your essay would be the use of references and statistics (even made up!)

PS: Keep in mind that grammar and spelling mistakes are not taken into consideration as long as they don’t hinder the corrector’s reading experience.

PSS: Note that this is a template specifically designed for SAT essays and correction methods, it does not apply to other tests or contexts.

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